>Oil Addiction: The World in Peril – 0

>by Pierre Chomat (Universal Publishers, 2004)

Back cover

Utterly addicted to oil. Man in his industrial adventure has transformed nearly all the Earth’s ecosystems into “egosystems” designed to serve only his own needs and desires, at the expense of all other species. He persists despite the irreversible damage he is causing to the environment. He has already disrupted the Earth’s thermostats.

Western society has reached the “Age of Excess” which will last onjy as long as there is still fossil energy to fuel it. The Earth cannot keep up with Man’s demand for natural resources. Her hydrocarbon reserves are shrinking rapidly and by 2010, global production will begin to decrease, setting off a period of unprecedented planetary disorder and turmoil.

Today the United States must import most of the oil it needs from faraway countries. Therein lies a terrible paradox: the power of America is rooted in dependency! The free enterprise system that it is imposing on the rest of the world cannot solve this paradoxical situation; it will only amplify it and hasten destabilization.

It is high time to wonder whether we in the West, in our suicidal quest for energy, are not running the risk of losing control of the course of our history. The invasion of lraq by the United States military, in lockstep with American corporations, is a distressing and reprehensible step in this direction.

Pierre Chomat was a manager in the French petroleum engineering industry and actively participated in the development of oil facilities in a number of countries in Europe, Africa and Asia. He also served as a consultant to international companies in the energy sector. His
professional expertise and personal knowledge of the Middle East and other oil-producing areas have given him a unioue perspective on energy issues.

Utterly addicted to oil. Man in his industrial adventure has transformed nearly all the Earth’s ecosystems into “egosystems” designed to serve only his own needs and desires, at the expense of all other species. He persists despite the irreversible damage he is causing to the environment. He has already disrupted the Earth’s thermostats.

Western society has reached the “Age of Excess” which will last onjy as long as there is still fossil energy to fuel it. The Earth cannot keep up with Man’s demand for natural resources. Her hydrocarbon reserves are shrinking rapidly and by 2010, global production will begin to decrease, setting off a period of unprecedented planetary disorder and turmoil.

Today the United States must import most of the oil it needs from faraway countries. Therein lies a terrible paradox: the power of America is rooted in dependency! The free enterprise system that it is imposing on the rest of the world cannot solve this paradoxical situation; it will only amplify it and hasten destabilization.

It is high time to wonder whether we in the West, in our suicidal quest for energy, are not running the risk of losing control of the course of our history. The invasion of lraq by the United States military, in lockstep with American corporations, is a distressing and reprehensible step in this direction.

Pierre Chomat was a manager in the French petroleum engineering industry and actively participated in the development of oil facilities in a number of countries in Europe, Africa and Asia. He also served as a consultant to international companies in the energy sector. His
professional expertise and personal knowledge of the Middle East and other oil-producing areas have given him a unioue perspective on energy issues.

Foreward by Jean-Michel Cousteau

A Deeply Compelling Work

Our planet Earth, the vessel that contains us all, is teetering on the brink. During the past 100 years, Man in the Northern Hemisphere has developed an industrial society based on the production and consumption of mass consumer goods. Produce, consume, discard – and produce even more so we can consume even more: that is the societal model of the world’s great powers, with North America leading the way followed closely by Europe and Japan. But to fuel this great machine, we need energy, lots of it – more and more, in fact. And so we burn our “black gold” with a reckless abandon that will ultimately destroy us.

To maintain this absurd way of life, the Western world – or “Empire of the Oil Addicts”, as Pierre Chomat so aptly calls it – is willing to place the Earth’s very survival in jeopardy.

For the Earth is growing dangerously warmer due to a greenhouse effect that is directly linked to increased fossil fuel consumption. But the dangers do not stop there. In order to guarantee sufficient oil supplies, the West subjects oil-producing nations to the economic and political pressures of a defacto colonialism that is now a dangerous source of conflict. Led by the
United States, which is facing dire circumstances with respect to domestic energy supplies, the West has begun declaring war …

The meaning behind recent events has not been accurately explained to us. What is now taking place is, in fact, the beginning of the energy wars. We have devoured our black gold at so fast a rate that our available reserves will be depleted during our children’s lifetime. Yet 55% of this precious energy is being consumed by only 14% of us. Will we burn and bleed the planet to death for the comfort of a small minority?

With remarkable boldness and clarity, Pierre Chomat relates the dramatic story that is ours, a story that is now unfolding, a story in which we each play a part. His professional experience with major multinationals in the energy field lends depth and credibility to this well documented and passionate work. His expertise as an engineer enables him to unravel complex energy policies. His love of humanity is the platform from which he lays out the immediate problems now facing us as a species. Are we going to allow our Earth to be devoured by the “Empire of the Oil Addicts”?

If we urge radical changes to our energy policies, if we abandon nation-based selfishness, founded on individual greed, for human solidarity, we can slow the senseless depletion of our energy resources. We can forge agreements that respect the rights and dignity of the Third World. And we can sustain the delicate ecological balance of the Earth on which we all depend for survival. Despite the extreme urgency of our situation, it is not too late. There is hope!

Jean-Michel Cousteau
President, Ocean Futures Society
30th of August 2003

At Dar el Safa
the Bedouin no longer hears the gusts of wind
nor the call from afar of his peregrine falcon.

Hypnotized by fumes and Western world racket
he holds in his hands a pile of gold coins
and carefully counts his day’s worth of earnings.

On the endless blue waters a boat has set sails
carrying his Safanyia ergamines away
toward unknown more industrious places.

– Anne Marie Chomat

Bill Totten http://www.ashisuto.co.jp/english/

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