>Depletion of Key Resources

>Facts at Your Fingertipsby Peter GoodchildCultureChange.org (January 27 2010)Editor's note: The author presents a definitive essay. Learn why:"Those who expect to get by with 'victory gardens' are unaware of the arithmetic involved"."There are already too many people to be supported by non-mechanized agriculture"."To meet the world's present energy needs by using solar power, then, we … Continue reading >Depletion of Key Resources

>You Can Have Progress without GDP-led Growth

>Interview of Pavan Sukhdev by Tom Levitttheecologist.org (January 22 2010)Deutsche Bank economist Pavan Sukhdev is heading up the groundbreaking TEEB (The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity) report and doing for nature what Sir Nicholas Stern did for climate change - valuing it.Tom Levitt: Why are we putting a value on nature, why don't we just … Continue reading >You Can Have Progress without GDP-led Growth

>Did the Banksters Kill James Garfield?

>FSK's Guide to Reality (January 24 2010)President James Garfield, who was murdered in 1881, is hardly ever mentioned in State brainwashing centers (schools).Here's some interesting quotes."He who controls the money supply of a nation controls the nation"."Whoever controls the volume of money in any country is absolute master of all industry and commerce".Allegedly, the latter … Continue reading >Did the Banksters Kill James Garfield?

>US Feeds One Quarter of its Grain to Cars …

>... while Hunger is on the Riseearthpolicy.org (January 21 2010)Note: As this article reports, the US now feeds more than a quarter of its total grain crop to its automobiles. That's enough to feed 330 million people for one year at average world consumption levels. This is important since the US supplies about half of … Continue reading >US Feeds One Quarter of its Grain to Cars …

>The Perils of Free Trade

>Economists routinely ignore its hidden costs to the environment and the communityby Herman E DalyScientific American (November 1993)No policy prescription commands greater consensus among economists than that of free trade based on international specialization according to comparative advantage. Free trade has long been presumed good unless proved otherwise. That presumption is the cornerstone of the … Continue reading >The Perils of Free Trade